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       Zoom Lectures in 2021
 
 

Monday 19 April: 

The Diary of Julie Manet

with Jane Roberts

Julie Manet photographed in 1894 at the age of sixteen.

In August 1893, Julie Manet is fourteen. Her father, Edouard Manet’s younger brother, had just died and her mother, the Impressionist  painter Berthe Morisot encourages her only daughter to write a diary. She will keep this precious record of her day-to-day life in Belle Epoque Paris until 1899, the year of her engagement to the painter Ernest Rouart. Hers was no ordinary circle of friends and acquaintances : they included Auguste Renoir and  the poet Stéphane Mallarmé, her guardians when her mother died suddenly in 1895, Edgar Degas , Claude Monet, Carolus Duran, Arséne Alexandre, Jacques-Emile Blanche, Teodore de Wyzewa, Paul-César Helleu or Abel Truchet  to name but a few. She not only  provides a personal and valuable insight into this brilliant generation of artists but also records  contemporary events such as the Russian Tsar’s State visit to Paris and the Dreyfus Affair that shook France so profoundly that it destroyed many friendships forever.

Berthe Morisot - Eugène Manet with Julie in the Garden at Bougival 1881, Paris, Musée Marmottan

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Monday 19 April 

Time: 5-6:30 pm French time (Zoom waiting room opens at 4:45, lecture begins promptly at 5:10)

Fee: 15€

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send us your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable us to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European bank account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send us an email notice of the transaction.

Although British by birth, Jane Roberts was educated in Switzerland and in France. She has lived in Paris since 1990, where she is an independent art historian and dealer specializing in 19th and 20th century paintings and drawings. Her current gallery is in the 6th arrondissement in Paris. Her last book was on Jacques-Emile Blanche (1861-1942) whose catalogue raisonné she published on-line in 2019. She first published The Diary of Julie Manet in 1987 with Sotheby’s Publications and a new translation with 472 footnotes in 2017 with I.B. Tauris London.

In 2011, she was made a “Chevalier de l’ Ordre des Arts et Lettres” for her services to French culture.

Jane Roberts Fine Arts , 10-12, rue de Savoie , 75006 Paris.

Tel : +33 1 42 68 05 32 - Mob : + 33 6 11 21 09 39 -  This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

www.janerobertsfinearts.com - www.jeblanche-catalogue.com

Monday 3 May 

Hockney-Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature - Museum of Fine Arts Houston

with curator Ann Dumas

David Hockney - Woldgate Vista 27 July 2005

Hockney-Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature was organized in partnership with the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, where the show was inaugurated in 2019. It presents a unique opportunity to see the work of these two great modern artists side by side. Although separate in time and space, David Hockney and Vincent van Gogh are united by remarkable similarities, goals, and above all, are distinguished by their ecstatic response to nature and a determination to see the world afresh. For both artists, this intense looking is expressed primarily through vibrant color. The two artists also share origins in Northern Europe: Van Gogh in Brabant in The Netherlands and Hockney in Bradford, Yorkshire in the north of England. For both, the quest for radiant light—which led Van Gogh to Provence, and Hockney to California—was transformative.

Despite obvious differences, the correspondence between the two artists is far more striking. Ultimately, each creates a painterly world that is utterly individual and true to themselves, yet at the same time is of immense universal appeal.

Vincent van Gogh - Field with Irises near Arles, May 1888

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Monday 3 May

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time (Zoom waiting room opens at 4:45, lecture begins promptly at 5:10)

Fee: 15€

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send us your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable us to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European bank account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send us an email notice of the transaction.

Ann Dumas has been a curator at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, for over twenty years and as of October 2019 she is also a consultant curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas, dividing her time between the two institutions.

Ann is a specialist in late-19c and early-20c French art. She studied art history at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London University (which is where she met Chris Boïcos). She has curated many exhibitions at the Royal Academy including Van Gogh: The Artist and his Letters (2010) and Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse (2016), in addition to exhibitions on Degas, Matisse, and the art dealer Ambroise Vollard at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 

Ann is the curator of Hockney-Van Gogh currently on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Next Week: Olympia on Mo. 12 April & Impressionists and Money on Wed. 14 or Th. 15 April

Paris Art Studies Calendar of Upcoming Lectures

Mondays 

Monday 12 April, 5-6:40 pm Paris: 

All You Ever Wanted to Know About Manet’s Olympia and More…

With Chris Boïcos

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Monday 19 April, 5-6:30 pm Paris: 

The Diary of Julie Manet

With Jane Roberts

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Monday 26 April, 5-6:40 pm Paris:  

The Portraits of Secession Vienna - Klimt, Schiele, Gerstl

With Chris Boïcos

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Monday 3 May, 5-6:40 pm Paris: 

Hockney-Van Gogh at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

With curator Ann Dumas

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History of Modern France 3:

Wednesday 14 or Thursday 15 April, 5-6:40 pm Paris: 

The Impressionists and Money: New Art and the Birth of the Modern Art Market, 1874-1900.

With Anne Catherine Abecassis

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Wednesday 21 or Thursday 22 April, 5-6:40 pm Paris: 

The Three Great Figures of French Art Nouveau: Siegfried Bing, Hector Guimard & Louis Majorelle.

With Chris Boïcos

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Wednesday 28 or Thursday 29 April, 5-6:40 pm Paris: 

The Birth of French Cinema: From the Lumière Brothers to Luis Buñuel, 1895-1930.

With Sylvie Koneski

 
 
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Monday 29 March: 

Algeria Decolonised: The Algerian War (1954-1962), 

Causes and Consequences.

with Mariam Habibi

Scene from the "The Battle of Algiers" (1966), Italian-Algerian historical war film co-written and directed by Gillo Pontecorvo  .

In 1962, after 132 years, the ‘Natives’ of Algeria finally seceded from mainland France. This war of secession or war of independence left behind it a bloody trail. It is hard to say when it precisely started, but it is easier to trace the blunders that allowed this tragedy to take place.

We shall start with World War One, because participation in this war produced, in the words of Benjamin Stora, a ‘loss of innocence’. Algerian Muslims fought bravely for France and received little compensation. Attempts at reform in the inter-war years were also doomed to failure as the gap between the Paris governments and the colonists of Algeria rapidly grew.

The inter-war years witnessed the birth of a national consciousness amongst native Algerians and a desire for independence. World War Two once again saw the active participation of Algerian French Natives in the liberation of occupied France: From that experience, they brought back a lesson that would soon be applied to their homeland, Algeria.

November 1st is celebrated in Algeria as ‘Independence Day’. It was indeed on that day in 1954 that open hostilities started. The war lasted eight years. It took a number of twists and turns. It ended with enormous numbers of casualties and an open wound on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea.  

This talk aims to analyze the causes and consequences of the Algerian war and look at ways that are currently being proposed to address its painful memories.

Exile: Algerian Europeans (Pieds noirs) with their meager luggage at the Maison Blanche airport waiting for their flight to France on 23 May 1962.

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Monday 29 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15€ 

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

 

History of Modern France 

The Third French Republic 3

April 2021

(scroll down for registration instructions)

 

Wednesday 7 or Thursday 8 April: 

“L’affaire!”: The Dreyfus Affair and the Division of France 1894-1906

with Mariam Habibi

In 1894 Alfred Dreyfus was found guilty of espionage by a military tribunal and was sent to serve a life sentence on Devil’s Island, off the coast of Guiana. The story could have ended there. The nation, with very few exceptions, unanimously accused the 35-year-old captain of collusion with the enemy, Germany. However, it took a little over a year for Georges Picquart, the new chief of the French intelligence service, to come across (without looking) evidence that Dreyfus was not the traitor. The real spy was a man called Ferdinand Walsin Esterhazy.  

From that point onwards, what was originally a ‘simple’ judicial error became a deliberate miscarriage of justice and over the next five years dragged France into a bloodless civil war. Dreyfusards and Anti-Dreyfusards vented their anger at one another and sought ‘justice’ for their cause. Attempt after attempt by supporters of Dreyfus to reopen the trial failed; the more irrefutable the proofs, the more uncompromising became the reaction of the authorities.

The Dreyfus Affair ended eventually with the annulment of all the accusations and the reintegration of Alfred Dreyfus into the army. In the words of Emile Zola ‘Truth was on the march and nothing could stop it’. Behind this ‘Affair’ however lay many questions: should France defend its honour by covering up a miscarriage of justice or should truth and justice prevail at any cost? For the French Jews, a more existential question was raised: should the community further assimilate in the hope of becoming part of the French nation or should they opt for other solutions?

Emile Zola's celebrated article about the "Affair" published in L'Aurore on 13 January 1898.

Wednesday 14 or Thursday 15 April: 

The Impressionists and Money: New Art and the Birth of the Modern Art Market, 1874-1900.

with Anne Catherine Abecassis

Catalog cover for the first Impressionist exhibition held in April/May 1874 at he former photographic studios of Félix Nadar (right) 35 boulevard des Capucines, Paris.

Barely sold for the price of the frame at the first Impressionist auction in 1875, Impressionist  paintings, are now among the most expensive in the world, fetching over a hundred million euros.

We will see how Monet, Renoir, Degas and the others, despite their difficult beginnings, had in the end very successful careers. In order to emerge from the shadows, the artists had to dramatically modify the art world with the help of a few innovative art dealers and invent a new economic system that still exists today: the modern art market.

In France in the 19th century, it was impossible to make a career without the support of the all-powerful Académie des Beaux-Arts and its well-attended annual exhibition, the Salon. The Impressionists tried their luck there, and were sometimes exhibited, but their careers did not take off. This forced them to invent new commercial strategies. The first Impressionist exhibitionwas organized in 1874 primarily to take charge of the promotion and sale of their works. Though it helped to establish their notoriety, it was a dismal commercial failure.

Our lecture will focus on the role of the Impressionist exhibitions in the emergence of the new art market and also on the new conception of the modern artist, through the development of the individual careers of Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Degas, Cézanne.... We will study the strategies put in place by the artists and the first great Impressionist dealers: Paul Durand-Ruel (the first to have had the audacious idea of considering art works as an object of speculation!), Georges Petit and Ambroise Vollard.

What relationships did they have with the artists? What impact did American collectors have on the Impressionists’ success? These are the questions we will try to answer.

Renoir's "Luncheon of the Boating Party" (1881) was bought by the great American collector Duncan Phillips from the Durannd-Reul gallery in 1923. Pictured at the back, wearing a top hat, is the famous French collector of Impressionist and Japanese art, Charles Ephrussi.

Wednesday 21 or Thursday 22 April: 

The Three Great Figures of French Art Nouveau: 

Siegfried Bing, Hector Guimard & Louis Majorelle.

with Chris Boïcos

A poster (1895) by Félix Vallotton advertising  Bing's Maison de l'Art Nouveau in Paris & La Maison Coilliot (1898-1900), house and factory of the ceramic entrepreneur by Hector Guimard in Lille.

The Art Nouveau style that emerged in the 1890s and briefly conquered much of Europe signaled both a new beginning and an end in the evolution of 19th century styles.  It defiantly broke with the classical and historicist traditions of the 19th century with the ambition of founding a radically new style on the eve of the 20th century. Yet it also revived the crafts and forgotten techniques of the pre-industrial age. Its sinuous lines referencing feminine beauty and nature forms did not, like bell-shaped skits and corsets, in the end, survive in the new machine age of the early 20th century. In many ways, it was the last attempt on the part of extremely talented artists and designers to restore a nostalgic sense of beauty and refinement in an increasingly brutish and mechanized world.

In France its most original representatives were undoubtedly the architect Hector Guimard, the art dealer Siegfired Bing and the cabinetmaker and manufacturer Louis Majorelle. In his buildings Guimard combined modern materials like glazed brick, cast iron and concrete with forms inspired by Gothic architecture, Japanese decoration and nature. Bing, who was also one of the great European dealers of Japanese prints, opened in Paris the veritable temple to the new style, the spectacular gallery designed by Henry van Velde with glass by Tiffany, the Maison de l’Art Nouveau. Majorelle was a founding member of the celebrated École de Nancy in Nancy in Lorraine, that included, cabinetmaker and glass artist Jacques Grüber, the glass and furniture designer Émile Gallé and the crystal manufactory of Daum. By tracing their careers we will see how Art Nouveau aspired to be more than a mere decorative style, but a complete world of beauty onto itself, an alternative to what its promoters considered to be the material vulgarity and aesthetic bankruptcy of the late Victorian age.

Louis Majorelle - Baby grand piano "La Mort du Cygne" ("Death of the Swan") 1903,  Private Collection.

Wednesday 28 or Thursday 29 April: 

The Birth of French Cinema: From the Lumière Brothers to Luis Buñuel, 1895-1930.

with Sylvie Koneski

France is the birthplace of cinema and was responsible for many of its significant contributions to the art form and the film-making process itself. The French film industry in the late 19th century and early 20th century was the world's most important.

Auguste and Louis Lumière released the first projection with the Cinematograph, in Paris on 28 December 1895 with their L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat. 1895 is considered by many historians as the official birth of cinematography. French films during this period catered to a growing middle class and were mostly shown in cafés and traveling fairs.

Méliès invented many of the techniques of cinematic grammar, and among his fantastic, surreal short subjects is the first science fiction film A Trip to the Moon (Le Voyage dans la Lune) in 1902.

Alice Guy-Blaché is largely forgotten now, but from 1896 to 1906, she was probably the only female filmmaker in the world and one of the first to make a narrative fiction film.

Whereas in Germany the mainstream Expressionist cinema was itself avant-garde, France presented a unique instance of a free interplay of filmmakers with other visual artists: painters, composers, architects, designers.

The Great War marked a major break for the industry, but in the 1920s’, a new generation of filmmakers appeared and cinema was at the heart of the intense artistic creativity of the “Années folles”.

Filmmakers, such as Louis Delluc, Marcel Lherbier, Germaine Dulac, Abel Gance, Jean Vigo, Jacques Feyder, and Jean Epstein represented what critics would define as “La Première Vague”  or the French Avant-garde, and started theorizing cinema’s specificity as a medium and as art.

Three directors emerged as major figures in the mainstream cinema: Jean Renoir, René Clair and Luis Buñuel. They had been immersed in the Dadaist art scene and brought the shock-value of Surrealism to the screen. Historical dramas and literary adaptation were also an important genre in the 1920s’.

The 1920s’ ended with a seismic event: the introduction of sound cinema.

Albert Dieudonné as Napoleon in Napoléon in the1927 silent French epic film by Abel Gance & a horrifying scene from Luis Buñuel's controversial L'Age d'Or (1930).

History of Modern France 

The Third French Republic 3

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: April 7 or 8 (Dreyfus Affair) - April 14 or 15 (Impressionists & Money) - 

April 21 or 22 (Art Nouveau) - April 28 or 29 (French Cinema) 

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the series of four.

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction

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Wednesday 24 or Thursday 25 March: 

A Thousand and One Fantasies:

Orientalism in 19th Century French Art and Literature

with Sylvie Koneski

J. A. D. Ingres - The Turkish Bath 1862, Paris, Musée du Louvre

The Orient fascinated the Western artists centuries prior to the turn of the 19th century. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Westerners felt as much fascination as fear for the great Ottoman empire and many examples of “Turqueries” can be found in painting and literature.

In 1798, Napoleon Bonaparte launched his Egyptian Campaign and opened the canonic period of French Orientalism, which extends from the late 18th through the early 20th centuries. 

European presence in Egypt and the beginning of the French colonial Empire in Algeria in 1830 attracted Western travelers to the Near and Middle East, many of whom captured their impressions in paint or print.

In art history, the term Orientalism refers to the works of the artists who specialized in Middle-Eastern subjects, As an art movement, Orientalist painting is generally treated as one of the many branches of 19th-century academic art; however, many different styles of Orientalist art were in evidence. French painters such as Eugène Delacroix and Jean-Léon Gérôme are widely regarded as the pioneers of the Orientalist movement.

In many of their works, French artists portrayed the Orient as the ultimate Other: exotic, barbaric, colorful or sensual. The Orient was often feminized, as it was colonized, which appears in the great number of harem scenes and portraits of lascivious odalisques.  

Extensive traveling by writers from the Romantic movement (Gérard de NervalThéophile Gautier) or fin-de-siècle novelists like Gustave Flaubert, Isabelle Eberhardt and Pierre Loti brought travelogues or sensational tales back to the West creating a great interest in all things "foreign.". Throughout the 19th Century, the Orient was an infinite source of inspiration and the Oriental imagination shaped France’s literature and art.

Jean-Léon Gerôme - Napoleon during his Campaign in Egypt 1863 St Petersburg, Hermitage Museum.

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Wednesday 24 or Thursday 25 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures in March.

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Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction

 
 
 

Monday 22 March: 

Fabergé: Beyond Easter

The Business Visionary and his Imperial Patrons

with Cynthia Coleman Sparke

Exactly how did a modest jewellery concern with an extremely un-Russian sounding name become an enduring symbol of Romanov luxury? This talk takes us beyond the legendary Easter eggs to consider the House of Fabergé's historical context as well as the  design sources, materials and techniques that distinguished the legendary firm from its contemporaries.  We look, in particular, at Fabergé objects designed to convey romantic ties, filial devotion, diplomatic esteem, and even the loyalty of a beloved pet.   

Tsar Nicholas II, Empress Alexandra and their children c. 1913

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Monday 22 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15€ 

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

Cynthia is an independent researcher, author and lecturer on Russian pre-Revolutionary works of art, consulting regularly on Fabergé for auction houses. Having periodically grown up on and off in Moscow within a family of Russian art collectors, she was destined for a career in Russian art. Previously, Cynthia ran the Russian Department for Christie’s in New York and worked for Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens in Washington DC. This was followed by a restoration project at the Alexander Palace in Tsarskoe Selo, Nicholas II’s last residence. Her book Russian Decorative Arts was published in 2014 by the Antique Collectors’ Club.  Cynthia now lives permanently in London. 

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it       

Website: www.coleman-consulting.co.uk

Instagram: @ccsparke

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Wednesday 17 or Thursday 18 March: 
Escaping Paris: The Seaside Holiday in Impressionist art, 1860-1900.
with Chris Boïcos

Claude Monet  - The Boardwalk in Trouville 1870, Private Collection
Three key factors contributed to the emergence of seaside resorts in France in the nineteenth century:
Sudden urban growth, particularly of Paris, whose population between 1800 and 1900 expanded from half a million to three million, causing the attendant problems of crowding, pollution and the spread of contagious diseases, notably tuberculosis – new-found prosperity for the city’s middle classes, a result of the economic and industrial revolutions of the 19th century – and finally the spread of the railway system making travel easier, swifter and more comfortable.
The seaside was viewed as the ideal spot to escape the bad air and diseases of the city and entire towns were created in the space of couple of decades to cater to the needs and comfort of an urban class migrating en masse to the northern seaside in the summer months or to the shores of the Mediterranean in the winter.
In our lecture we will follow how the new artists of the era – Boudin, Courbet, Monet, Manet, Degas, Seurat, Signac, among others – responded to the discovery of the seaside in their own travels and depictions of the modern resorts, places like Deauville, Trouville, Ste Adresse or Dieppe on the English Channel coast, Belle Isle, Concarneau and Biarritz on the Atlantic, or Antibes, Nice and St Tropez on the Riviera.
The result was the birth of an entirely new artistic genre – the tourist marine – which survived well into the 20th century in the work of great artists like Matisse, Duffy, Picasso and more.

Edgar Degas - Beach Scene, c.1869-70, London, National Gallery
Place: Zoom lecture
Dates: Wednesday 17 or Thursday 18 March
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures.
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Payment Instructions: 
Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.
1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

 

Wednesday 10 or Thursday 11 March: 

Japonisme! The Impact of Japan on French Art, 1860-1890

with Anne Catherine Abecassis

Édouard Manet - Émile Zola 1868, Paris, Musée d'Orsay

Closed to the West since 1641, Japan opened to trade - forced by the United States - in the mid-19th century. One of the consequences for Westerners was the discovery of a new artistic universe. Japanism was thus born out of the fascination exerted by the books, prints and decorative arts of these distant and exotic islands.

At a time when a new generation of artists was questioning the rules and traditions of 19th century academic painting and was seeking to renew the formal language of painting, Japanese art provided a completely different model and alternative to the Classical ideals prevalent in Europe since the Renaissance. The Japanese prints of the masters of the ukiyo-e school ("Pictures of the Floating World"), discovered in particular during the World Expositions in London (1862) and Paris (1867, 1878 and 1889), gave rise to a real enthusiasm among these artists and became a new source of inspiration.

The influence of Japanese prints is  a major element in the revival of Western painting and a determining factor in the birth of modern art as our lecture will demonstrate. Manet, Degas, Monet, Tissot, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec are among the masters we will study along with the great Japanese printmakers, Hokusai, Hiroshige and Utamaro.

Utagawa Hiroshige - One Hundred Hiroshige Famous Views of Edo: 

View of Nihonbashi 1858, Color woodcut

Dates: Wednesday 10 or Thursday 11 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures.

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Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

 

 

 

Monday 8 March

The Golden Age of French Caricature 2:

Toulouse-Lautrec to Paul Iribe, 1880-1914.

with Chris Boïcos

Charles Léandre - Yvette Guilbert (portrait-charge) 1898

The turbulent politics of the 19th century strongly favored the emergence of political satire and caricature, in which the high and mighty of each successive government were mercilessly mocked in the opposition papers. The the stage and literary celebrities of the day also became a favorite target of the caricaturists, whereas the rise of socialist and anarchist challenges to the social and economic order, opened the gates to ferocious caricatures of Capitalist society after 1890.

In this second part of our lecture, we will concentrate on the new periodicals of the end of the century (Le Grelot, L’Assiette au beurre) which flourished after the definitive establishment of freedom of speech and publication by the Third Republic in 1881 and their principal illustrators:  Alfred le Petit, Charles Léandre, Toulouse-Lautrec, Félix Valotton, Caran d’Ache, Frantisek Kupka, Théophile Steinlen, Paul Iribe and more. We will also look at the impact of the celebrated Dreyfus affair, which tore apart French society from 1894 to 1905, on the press and illustration and describe the advent of the first virulently antisemitic caricatures of the modern era.

Victor Lenepveu - TheTraitor! (Caricature of Captain Alfred Dreyfus) 1900

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Monday 8 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15€ 

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

Wednesday 3 or Thursday 4 March: 

France in Algeria: From Conquest to Colony, 1830-1900. 

with Mariam Habibi

Abd El-Kader (1807-1883), the celebrated resistant to the French invasion Algeria

 by Marie Eleonore Godefroid, Paris, musée de l'Armée

In June 1830 a massive French fleet consisting of 37,000 men landed at Siddi Ferruch, on the Algerian coast 27 kilometres from the town of Algiers. This event opened the Franco-Algerian chapter for the history of both countries. The conquest and later the colonisation of Algeria raised a number of ethical, philosophical and tactical questions. The period coincided with a number of regime changes back in France and consequently, each new administration had its own brand of rule to impose.

The lecture will cover these events from 1830 to the end of the 19th century. In the early years, during the reign of Louis-Philippe, the Algerian conquest was slow and difficult, yet the battles were remembered, thanks to artists such as Horace Vernet, as glorious victories. Indeed, the ‘victories’ were displayed in the galleries of the newly inaugurated History museum of the palace of Versailles, as a tool of national unity. Napoleon III referred to Algeria as his Arab Kingdom; he was both the Emperor of the Arabs and the Emperor of the French. This ideal was reflected in the Arab Bureaus whose aim was to view Arabs, ‘not as enemies who must be destroyed, but as men who must be convinced’. This attitude contrasted vastly with that of the settlers, who sought first and foremost to take possession of the land of Algerians and repopulate the land. With the advent of the Third Republic, after the loss of Alsace-Lorraine to the Germans, the maintenance of French Algeria became an essential duty to all patriotic Republicans.  

The relationship between France and Algeria is a convoluted and complicated stretch of memories. Historians on both shores still have a great deal of work to do to complete it. This lecture will aim to lay the first bricks in that edifice.

Horace Vernet - The Battle of Isly, 14 August 1844, 1846, Château de Versailles.

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Wednesday 3 or Thursday 4 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures (also available as recordings of the live sessions).

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

 

---------------------------------------------------- 

Monday 1 March

The Golden Age of French Caricature:

From Daumier to Steinlen, 1830-1910.

with Chris Boïcos

Honoré Daumier - The Past, the Present, the Future 

(Caricature of King Louis-Philippe) Lithograph, 1834.

The elimination of the press censorship laws (albeit briefly) under King Louis-Philippe in the 1830s and their permanent abolition under the Third Republic in 1881, launched in France what will prove to be the golden age of the press.

The invention of a new printing technique for the mass production of images in the late 18th century – lithography – also enabled the new periodicals, to furnish their readers with a great wealth and variety of illustration.

The turbulent politics and many revolutions of the 19th century strongly favored the emergence of political satire and caricature, in which the high and mighty of each successive regime were mercilessly mocked in the opposition papers.

The new urban middle class and its fashionable pretensions also became a favorite target of the caricaturists of the 19th century, whereas towards the end of the era, the rise of socialist and anarchist challenges to the social and economic order, opened the gates to ferocious caricatures of Capitalist society.

In our lecture we will present the principal French illustrators of the century, beginning, of course with the father of modern caricature, the celebrated Honoré Daumier, but also his lesser known, if equally talented colleagues, André Gill, Alfred le Petit, Charles Léandre, Caran d’Ache, Frantisek Kupka, Théophile Steinlen and more. We will also discover the principal illustrated periodicals of the day from the famous Charivari to Gill’s La Lune and the provocative anarchist periodical of the turn of the century, L’Assiette au beurre.

František Kupka - "We pacify sometimes.." L'Assiette au Beurre, 1904.

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Monday 1 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15€ 

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

Wednesday 3 or Thursday 4 March: 

France in Algeria: From Conquest to Colony, 1830-1900. 

with Mariam Habibi

Abd El-Kader (1807-1883), the celebrated resistant to the French invasion Algeria

 by Marie Eleonore Godefroid, Paris, musée de l'Armée

In June 1830 a massive French fleet consisting of 37,000 men landed at Siddi Ferruch, on the Algerian coast 27 kilometres from the town of Algiers. This event opened the Franco-Algerian chapter for the history of both countries. The conquest and later the colonisation of Algeria raised a number of ethical, philosophical and tactical questions. The period coincided with a number of regime changes back in France and consequently, each new administration had its own brand of rule to impose.

The lecture will cover these events from 1830 to the end of the 19th century. In the early years, during the reign of Louis-Philippe, the Algerian conquest was slow and difficult, yet the battles were remembered, thanks to artists such as Horace Vernet, as glorious victories. Indeed, the ‘victories’ were displayed in the galleries of the newly inaugurated History museum of the palace of Versailles, as a tool of national unity. Napoleon III referred to Algeria as his Arab Kingdom; he was both the Emperor of the Arabs and the Emperor of the French. This ideal was reflected in the Arab Bureaus whose aim was to view Arabs, ‘not as enemies who must be destroyed, but as men who must be convinced’. This attitude contrasted vastly with that of the settlers, who sought first and foremost to take possession of the land of Algerians and repopulate the land. With the advent of the Third Republic, after the loss of Alsace-Lorraine to the Germans, the maintenance of French Algeria became an essential duty to all patriotic Republicans.  

The relationship between France and Algeria is a convoluted and complicated stretch of memories. Historians on both shores still have a great deal of work to do to complete it. This lecture will aim to lay the first bricks in that edifice.

Horace Vernet - The Battle of Isly, 14 August 1844, 1846, Château de Versailles.

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Wednesday 3 or Thursday 4 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures.

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

Wednesday 10 or Thursday 11 March: 

Japonisme! The Impact of Japan on French Art, 1860-1890

with Anne Catherine Abecassis

Édouard Manet - Émile Zola 1868, Paris, Musée d'Orsay

Closed to the West since 1641, Japan opened to trade - forced by the United States - in the mid-19th century. One of the consequences for Westerners was the discovery of a new artistic universe. Japanism was thus born out of the fascination exerted by the books, prints and decorative arts of these distant and exotic islands.

At a time when a new generation of artists was questioning the rules and traditions of 19th century academic painting and was seeking to renew the formal language of painting, Japanese art provided a completely different model and alternative to the Classical ideals prevalent in Europe since the Renaissance. The Japanese prints of the masters of the ukiyo-e school ("Pictures of the Floating World"), discovered in particular during the World Expositions in London (1862) and Paris (1867, 1878 and 1889), gave rise to a real enthusiasm among these artists and became a new source of inspiration.

The influence of Japanese prints is  a major element in the revival of Western painting and a determining factor in the birth of modern art as our lecture will demonstrate. Manet, Degas, Monet, Tissot, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec are among the masters we will study along with the great Japanese printmakers, Hokusai, Hiroshige and Utamaro.

Utagawa Hiroshige - One Hundred Hiroshige Famous Views of Edo: 

View of Nihonbashi 1858, Color woodcut

Dates: Wednesday 10 or Thursday 11 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures.

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

Wednesday 17 or Thursday 18 March: 

Escaping Paris: The Seaside Holiday in Impressionist art, 1860-1900.

with Chris Boïcos

Claude Monet  - The Boardwalk in Trouville 1870, Private Collection

Three key factors contributed to the emergence of seaside resorts in France in the nineteenth century:

Sudden urban growth, particularly of Paris, whose population between 1800 and 1900 expanded from half a million to three million, causing the attendant problems of crowding, pollution and the spread of contagious diseases, notably tuberculosis – new-found prosperity for the city’s middle classes, a result of the economic and industrial revolutions of the 19th century – and finally the spread of the railway system making travel easier, swifter and more comfortable.

The seaside was viewed as the ideal spot to escape the bad air and diseases of the city and entire towns were created in the space of couple of decades to cater to the needs and comfort of an urban class migrating en masse to the northern seaside in the summer months or to the shores of the Mediterranean in the winter.

In our lecture we will follow how the new artists of the era – Boudin, Courbet, Monet, Manet, Degas, Seurat, Signac, among others – responded to the discovery of the seaside in their own travels and depictions of the modern resorts, places likeDeauville, Trouville, Ste Adresse or Dieppe on the English Channel coast, Belle Isle, Concarneau and Biarritz on the Atlantic, or Antibes, Nice and St Tropez on the Riviera.

The result was the birth of an entirely new artistic genre – the tourist marine – which survived well into the 20th century in the work of great artists like Matisse, Duffy, Picasso and more.

Edgar Degas - Beach Scene, c.1869-70, London, National Gallery

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Wednesday 17 or Thursday 18 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures.

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

Wednesday 24 or Thursday 25 March: 

A Thousand and One Fantasies: 

Orientalism in 19th Century French Art and Literature

with Sylvie Koneski

J. A. D. Ingres - The Turkish Bath, 1862, Paris, Musée du Louvre

The Orient fascinated the Western artists centuries prior to the turn of the 19th century. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Westerners felt as much fascination as fear for the great Ottoman empire and many examples of “Turqueries” can be found in painting and literature.

In 1798, Napoleon Bonaparte launched his Egyptian Campaign and opened the canonic period of French Orientalism, which extends from the late 18th through the early 20th centuries. 

European presence in Egypt and the beginning of the French colonial Empire in Algeria in 1830 attracted Western travelers to the Near and Middle East, many of whom captured their impressions in paint or print.

In art history, the term Orientalism refers to the works of the artists who specialized in Middle-Eastern subjects, As an art movement, Orientalist painting is generally treated as one of the many branches of 19th-century academic art; however, many different styles of Orientalist art were in evidence. French painters such as Eugène Delacroix  and Jean-Léon Gérôme are widely regarded as the pioneers of the Orientalist movement.

In many of their works, French artists portrayed the Orient as the ultimate Other: exotic, barbaric, colorful or sensual. The Orient was often feminized, as it was colonized, which appears in the great number of harem scenes and portraits of lascivious odalisques.  

Extensive traveling by writers from the Romantic movement (Gérard de Nerval, Théophile Gautier) or fin-de-siècle novelists like Gustave Flaubert, Isabelle Eberhardt and Pierre Loti brought travelogues or sensational tales back to the West creating a great interest in all things "foreign.". Throughout the 19th Century, the Orient was an infinite source of inspiration and the Oriental imagination shaped France’s literature and art.

Jean-Léon Gerôme - Napoleon during his Campaign in Egypt 1863 St Petersburg, Hermitage Museum

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Wednesday 24 or Thursday 25 March

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ per lecture or 60€ for the full series of Wednesday or Thursday lectures.

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Wednesday 10 February or Thursday 11 February

 The Politics of Art: 

Painting, Sculpture, Architecture & the Third French Republic, 1871-1895

with Chris Boïcos.

Albert Fernique - Photograph of Bartholdi's Statue of Liberty assembled in Paris, 1884.

Having emerged out of the ashes of war and revolution in 1871, the French Third Republic turned out to be, beyond all expectations, a resilient regime lasting much longer than most post-revolutionary French governments, until its final collapse at the opening of the Second World War in 1940.

Young and fragile in its first two decades it had to affirm itself and its legitimacy and one way of doing so was by creating a new historical mythology based on its vision of « la nation », the French Revolution of 1789 and its imagined roots in all periods of French history. Art, sculpture and  architecture contributed largely to this endeavor and provided the young regime with the imagery and symbolism that in many ways survives in modern France to this day.

In our lecture we will study the visual symbols of the Republic most particularly in Paris and also see how monuments and historical figures of the past were smoothly absorbed into the iconography of the new regime by its official painters, sculptors and architects: Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Alfred Roll, Léon BonnatJules Dalou, Léon Lhermitte, Auguste Bartholdi (creator of the Statue of Liberty of New York), Gustave Eiffel and Garbriel Davioud among others.

We will also see how the modern schools of the period responded to and sometimes undermined the artistic and cultural politics of the Republic by creating alternative styles or iconography - Monet, Seurat, Signac, Maximilien Luce and Rodin being among the most prominent examples of this reaction.

Georges Seurat - Eiffel Tower c. 1889, Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Wednesday 10 February (very few spots left) or Thursday 11 February (open)

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ 

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

 

Monday 8 February

Awaiting the Apocalypse - German Art and the Third Reich

Part Two: 1936 - 1944

with Chris Boïcos

Felix Nussbaum - Self-Portrait with Jewish Identity Card 1943, Nussbaum Museum, Osnabrück 

Even before the arrival of Adolf Hitler to power as chancellor of the German Republic in January 1933, the rise and threat of National Socialist ideology was felt in the Weimar Republic from the late 1920s onwards. The Bauhaus, Germany’s most progressive art and design school, had had to abandon its premises in Weimar after the election of a conservative government supported by the Nazi party in the state of Thuringia in 1925. After the Nazis won the municipal elections in Dessau, the Bauhaus had to move yet again from its second location to Berlin where, finally, after a Gestapo search in April 1933, the school was dissolved altogether.

In our lecture we will trace the impact of German politics on the art of the era and particularly the reaction of the modern artists in Germany to the advent of the Third Reich. We will see how the new regime defined what was true German and “un-German” art, culminating in the celebrated "Entartete Kunst" (“Degenerate Art”) exhibition held in Munich in 1937. We will follow many artists’ paths to external or internal exile and see how art, despite constant adversity and the great vulnerability of its creators, can still reveal and define the profound truths of the human condition in the most extreme circumstances.

Max Beckmann, Felix Nussbaum, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Käthe Kollwitz, Max Ernst, Franz Radziwill, Charlotte Salomon, Richard Oelze, Emil Nolde, John Heartfield and Adolf Ziegler are among the principal artists whose work we will be examining.

 Max Ernst - Europe after the Rain II 1940-42, Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Monday 8 February

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15€

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction

Wednesday 3 February or Thursday 4 February

Art in a Time of War: 

French Artists during the Franco-Prussian War & the Paris Commune

with Anne Catherine Abecassis.

July 1870 - June 1871 was a terrible year for Paris. Paris and its suburbs suffered two sieges, the first by the Prussian army, the second by the French and in the civil war that ensued, Paris was left in ruins.

In the decade that followed, the depiction of the Franco-Prussian War by the academic painters of the Salon was the expression of a heavy wound on the one hand, and a gesture of resilience, on the other, an attempt to overcome the humiliation of defeat. The trauma of the war, the misery and famine that it caused, the harshness of the winter of 1870-71, the violence of the Commune and the ruined Parisian landscape will be widely illustrated at the Salon.

For some artists of the “New Painting” - Corot, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Bazille - political commitment led to their direct involvement in the events of the day, whether politically, militarily or artistically and for a number of them, to produce militant works.

Others, however, like Monet, Pissarro, Sisley and Rodin chose exile. Fleeing the advance of the enemy troops and the impending siege of Paris, they also fled the collapse of the Paris art market to the safety and prosperity of the British capital – London. The works the French artists exhibited and, in many cases, sold to English collectors brought a breath of modernity to British art and its institutions. Conversely, the experience of exile across the Channel exerted a new influence on French art.

Upon their return to France, these self-exiled artists chose to ignore the stigmata left by the war in the Parisian landscape. It was not the ruins that interested this generation of painters, but the new Paris rising from its ashes! Theirs was a commitment to another revolution, this time to art rather than politics. Initiated by the Realist movement before the war, this artistic revolution was confirmed, only four years after the disasters of the Commune, by the birth of Impressionism in the first Impressionist exhibition of April 1874.

Édouard Manet - The Barricade 1871, Lithograph

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Wednesday 3 February (very few spots left) or Thursday 4 February (open).

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ 

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

 

Monday 1 February

Awaiting the Apocalypse - German Art and the Third Reich

Part One: 1930-1936

with Chris Boïcos

Max Beckmann - Departure 1932-35 MoMA, New York

Even before the arrival of Adolf Hitler to power as chancellor of the German Republic in January 1933, the rise and threat of National Socialist ideology was felt in the Weimar Republic from the late 1920s onwards. The Bauhaus, Germany’s most progressive art and design school, had had to abandon its premises in Weimar after the election of a conservative government supported by the Nazi party in the state of Thuringia in 1925. After the Nazis won the municipal elections in Dessau, the Bauhaus had to move yet again from its second location to Berlin where, finally, after a Gestapo search in April 1933, the school was dissolved altogether.

In our lecture we will trace the impact of German politics on the art of the era and particularly the reaction of the modern artists in Germany to the advent of the Third Reich. We will see how the new regime defined what was true German and “un-German” art, culminating in the celebrated "Entartete Kunst" (“Degenerate Art”) exhibition held in Munich in 1937. We will follow many artists’ paths to external or internal exile and see how art, despite constant adversity and the great vulnerability of its creators, can still reveal and define the profound truths of the human condition in the most extreme circumstances.

Max Beckmann, Felix Nussbaum, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Käthe Kollwitz, Max Ernst, Franz Radziwill, Charlotte Salomon, Richard Oelze, Emil Nolde, John Heartfield and Adolf Ziegler are among the principal artists whose work we will be examining.

Hubert Lanzinger - The Standard Bearer 1935, U.S. Army Center of Military History, Washington

Place: Zoom lecture

Dates: Monday 1 February

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15€

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

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Wednesday 3 February & Thursday 4 February

Art in a Time of War: 

French Artists during the Franco-Prussian War & the Paris Commune

with Anne Catherine Abecassis.

July 1870 - June 1871 was a terrible year for Paris. Paris and its suburbs suffered two sieges, the first by the Prussian army, the second by the French and in the civil war that ensued, Paris was left in ruins.

In the decade that followed, the depiction of the Franco-Prussian War by the academic painters of the Salon was the expression of a heavy wound on the one hand, and a gesture of resilience, on the other, an attempt to overcome the humiliation of defeat. The trauma of the war, the misery and famine that it caused, the harshness of the winter of 1870-71, the violence of the Commune and the ruined Parisian landscape will be widely illustrated at the Salon.

For some artists of the “New Painting” - Corot, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Bazille - political commitment led to their direct involvement in the events of the day, whether politically, militarily or artistically and for a number of them, to produce militant works.

Others, however, like Monet, Pissarro, Sisley and Rodin chose exile. Fleeing the advance of the enemy troops and the impending siege of Paris, they also fled the collapse of the Paris art market to the safety and prosperity of the British capital – London. The works the French artists exhibited and, in many cases, sold to English collectors brought a breath of modernity to British art and its institutions. Conversely, the experience of exile across the Channel exerted a new influence on French art.

Upon their return to France, these self-exiled artists chose to ignore the stigmata left by the war in the Parisian landscape. It was not the ruins that interested this generation of painters, but the new Paris rising from its ashes! Theirs was a commitment to another revolution, this time to art rather than politics. Initiated by the Realist movement before the war, this artistic revolution was confirmed, only four years after the disasters of the Commune, by the birth of Impressionism in the first Impressionist exhibition of April 1874.

Édouard Manet - The Barricade 1871, Lithograph

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Wednesday 3 February (very few spots left) & Thursday 4 February (open)

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 17€ 

-------------------------------

Payment Instructions: 

Please state the name or date of the lecture(s) you wish to attend in your response.

1. Payment after reception of an invoice for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

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A History of Modern France - Politics, Society and Culture
Part One: The French Third Republic I
------------------------ 
Wednesday 27 January - 5pm Paris
From War to Revolution: A History of the Paris Commune of 1871
with Mariam Habibi 

 PhD Institut de Sciences Politiques, Paris. Professor of History at USC, Paris.

The far-reaching consequences of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1) are often left untold. It was a relatively short war, that nonetheless set into motion a Franco-German animosity that would drag the entire planet into the depths of tragedy for decades to come. This ill- fated war ended the Second Empire, forced Napoleon III into exile and allowed France to emerge as the sole ‘Republic’ in the midst of European monarchies. The advent of the Third Republic (1870-1940) was not easy. The new regime had to face a country occupied by Prussian troops, a capital exhausted by a long siege and a civil war that brought Parisians onto the streets, erecting barricades and proclaiming a revolutionary Commune.
Our lecture will walk us through these eventful months, starting with the declaration of War and the flight of Napoleon III (July 1870), the Proclamation of a Republic (September 1870), the Siege and eventual Fall of Paris (September-January 1870-71) and ending with the civil war (March -May 1871). This last event known as the “Paris Commune” captured the interest of writers, artists and revolutionaries.Karl Marx hailed it as ‘the glorious harbinger of a new society’ and indeed, though short and chaotic, it turned into a laboratory of many ideas. In 1871, Paris had, once again, fulfilled the role that Victor Hugo had assigned her’ (…) Paris goes her own way. France irritated, is forced to follow; later she calms down and applauds:  it is one of the forms of our national life.’ 
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Wednesday 3 February - 5pm Paris

Art in a Time of War: 

French Artists during the Franco-Prussian War & the Paris Commune

                                            with Anne Catherine Abecassis 

                PhD in Art History, Sorbonne, Professor of French Cultural Studies at USC, Paris

July 1870 - June 1871 was a terrible year for Paris. Paris and its suburbs suffered two sieges, the first by the Prussian army, the second by the French and in the civil war that ensued, Paris was left in ruins.

In the decade that followed, the depiction of the Franco-Prussian War by the academic painters of the Salon was the expression of a heavy wound on the one hand, and a gesture of resilience, on the other, an attempt to overcome the humiliation of defeat. The trauma of the war, the misery and famine that it caused, the harshness of the winter of 1870-71, the violence of the Commune and the ruined Parisian landscape will be widely illustrated at the Salon.

For some artists of the “New Painting” - Corot, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Bazille - political commitment led to their direct involvement in the events of the day, whether politically, militarily or artistically and for a number of them, to produce militant works.

Others, however, like Monet, Pissarro, Sisley and Rodin chose exile. Fleeing the advance of the enemy troops and the impending siege of Paris, they also fled the collapse of the Paris art market to the safety and prosperity of the British capital – London. The works the French artists exhibited and, in many cases, sold to English collectors brought a breath of modernity to British art and its institutions. Conversely, the experience of exile across the Channel exerted a new influence on French art.

Upon their return to France, these self-exiled artists chose to ignore the stigmata left by the war in the Parisian landscape. It was not the ruins that interested this generation of painters, but the new Paris rising from its ashes! Theirs was a commitment to another revolution, this time to art rather than politics. Initiated by the Realist movement before the war, this artistic revolution was confirmed, only four years after the disasters of the Commune, by the birth of Impressionism in the first Impressionist exhibition of April 1874.

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Wednesday 10 February - 5pm Paris

The Politics of Art: 

Painting, Sculpture, Architecture & the Third French Republic,

1871-1895

with Chris Boïcos

PhD in Art History, Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Professor of Art History, USC, Paris 

Having emerged out of the ashes of war and revolution in 1871, the French Third Republic turned out to be, beyond all expectations, a resilient regime lasting much longer than most post-revolutionary French governments, until its final collapse at the opening of the Second World War in 1940.

Young and fragile in its first two decades it had to affirm itself and its legitimacy and one way of doing so was by creating a new historical mythology based on its vision of « la nation », the French Revolution of 1789 and its imagined roots in all periods of French history. Art, sculpture and  architecture contributed largely to this endeavor and provided the young regime with the imagery and symbolism that in many ways survives in modern France to this day.

In our lecture we will study the visual symbols of the Republic most particularly in Paris and also see how monuments and historical figures of the past were smoothly absorbed into the iconography of the new regime by its official painters, sculptors and architects: Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Alfred Roll, Léon Bonnat, Jules Dalou, Léon Lhermitte, Auguste Bartholdi (creator of the Statue of Liberty of New York), Gustave Eiffel and Garbriel Davioud among others.

We will also see how the modern schools of the period responded to and sometimes undermined the artistic and cultural politics of the Republic by creating alternative styles or iconography - Monet, Seurat, Signac, Maximilien Luce and Rodin being among the most prominent examples of this reaction.

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Wednesday 17 February - 5pm Paris

Absinthe: The “Green Fairy” of 19th Century Paris

with Sylvie Koneski

PhD University of Southern California

Profeesor of Literature, USC Paris

“Paris makes absinthe, but absinthe makes Paris”.

The era when alcohol played a dominant role within literature and the arts began in the mid- 19th century and continued throughout the 20th. Members of the working classes, as well artists, writers, scientists, whether rich or poor, had recourse to the use of drugs and alcohol, some stronger and more exotic than others.

Few alcoholic beverages figure in literature, painting, and poetry as much as absinthe.

“Artemisia absinthium”, a rather bitter plant, was known and used in the ancient times as medicine. Once a process was invented to use absinthe as the essence of a spirit in the mid-19th century, it became the favorite intoxicating beverage of all classes of French society.

Absinthe drinking involved a fascinating ritual that attracted Bourgeois and Bohemians alike every evening from 5 to 7 pm in Parisian cafés during what used to be called “the Green Hour”.

Poets like Musset, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine all fell into the arms of their new Muse. Absinthe soon earned a reputation for itself as a psychoactive drink and many artists turned to it in the hopes it would spark inspiration. As painters of modern life, Manet, Degas, Van Gogh and Toulouse-Lautrec, all represented the grandeur and, later on, the decadence of the “Green Fairy”.

It is no secret that alcoholic beverages, especially wine, has long been a component of French social life. But increasing alcohol abuse and absinthe addiction towards the end of 19th Century was the cause of many social problems.

During the course of the 19th century, Paris was the scene of several uprisings and social revolutions. As a result, the now-empowered bourgeois class feared that alcoholism and especially absinthism would lead to more upheavals. As a result, temperance movements were born and increasingly gained strength within French society.

The once fashionable and worshiped spirit had now become the favorite target of anti-alcohol movements, whose leaders insisted that it was a deadly poison and the cause of mental illness, especially among the working classes. But whereas in the US, prohibition led to the banning of all alcoholic drinks, in France, it was to be limited to absinthe.

Absinthe was banned in 1915 … but not forever.

 

 

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Degas and the Stage:

Dancers and Singers in the Art of Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas - Dance Examination 1880, Denver Art Museum

More than any other artist of the 19th century, Degas found inspiration in the figures of the ballet dancers of the Paris Operawhom he studied obsessively over many decades.

His paintings, drawings and prints of the dancers offer us a complete vision, not only of their movements and performances on stage, but also their life in the rehearsal rooms, dressing rooms, and the backstage of the theater, their grinding daily routines and their suitors.

A less well-known theme in Degas’ art are his colorful depictions of the musical hall singers of 19th century Paris in the more « vulgar » setting of the café-concerts of the Champs-Elysées - a subject that will greatly inspire future painters of Paris night life like J. L. Forain and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

We will see how both subjects, in their great variety of composition, use of pose and artistic techniques, provide us with one of the richest examinations of femininity and the world of professional female performers in the history of art.

 Edgar Degas - Singer with a Glove 1878, Fogg Museum, Harvard

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Monday 18 January

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15 € 

Payment Instructions: 

Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:

1. Payment after reception of an invoice  for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

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Artemisia Gentileschi at the National Gallery, London  
In 17th-century Europe, at a time when women artists were not easily accepted, Artemisia was exceptional. She challenged conventions and defied expectations to become a successful artist and one of the great storytellers of her time.
In this first major exhibition of Artemisia’s work in the UK, are displayed her best-known paintings including two versions of her iconic ‘Judith beheading Holofernes’; as well as her self portraits, heroines from history and the Bible, and recently discovered personal letters.
According to the curators of the exhibition, “Artemisia painted subjects that were traditionally the preserve of male artists and for the male gaze; transforming meek maidservants into courageous conspirators and victims into survivors.”
We will follow her extremely successful career which beginning in Rome took her to Florence, Venice, Naples and, briefly, to the artistically blossoming London of Charles I. We will compare her paintings to those of her talented father, Orazio Gentileschi, to the other great Roman painter who inspired her early style - Michelangelo Caravaggio - and we will see what in particular distinguished her style and thematic interpretations from those of her male colleagues of the early Baroque age.
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 11 January
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15 € 
 
Payment Instructions: 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice  for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.   
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The Stories of Berthe and Eva

Édouard Manet met the future Impressionist painter, Berthe Morisot, while copying Old Master paintings at the Louvre in 1868. Between their meeting and her marriage to his brother, Eugène Manet, in 1874 he painted six portraits of her, a testimony to the great fascination her looks and personality exercised on him.
The painter Eva Gonzalès, who came from a bourgeois Spanish family settled in Paris, was introduced to Manet by their mutual friend the Belgian artist, Alfred Stevens. She entered Manet’s studio as a pupil in 1869 immediately provoking the jealousy of Berthe Morisot. She went on to a remarkable artistic career cut short by her early death in 1883. Unlike Berthe Morisot, but like Manet, she never exhibited with the Impressionist group.

The story of Manet’s relationship with these two women artists, to whom he was intimately linked, will be the subject of our next lecture. We will be analyzing key pictures by all three artists as well as portraits by their mutual friend and one-time suitor of Berthe, Edgar Degas. 

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Monday 4 January

Time: 5-6:40 pm French time

Fee: 15 € 

Payment Instructions: 

Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:

1. Payment after reception of an invoice  for several lectures by any of the methods below.

2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.

As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.

3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:

https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos

4. By transfer if you have a European account to:

Chris Boicos Fine Arts

BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     

Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction. 
 
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 The Stories of Suzanne and Victorine
 
Suzanne Leenhoff (1829-1906) met her future husband, Édouard Manet when she was hired by his mother to teach the piano to her sons when Manet was 17. In 1852 she gave birth to a son, Léon, whose paternity is still in doubt as she seems to have had affairs with both the teen-aged Édouard and his father, Auguste. Manet married Suzanne shortly after his father’s death in 1863 and though not particularly faithful, remained deeply attached and fond of her until his death in 1883. In our lecture we will be analyzing the dozen portrayals of Suzanne painted through Manet’s career and how they define his vision of her and their relationship.
Victorine Meurent (1844-1927) was Manet’s most important model for the first half of his career made notorious by posing in the nude for “Olympia” in 1863. Manet met her when she was 18 and was immediately taken by her luscious red hair and luminous, pale complexion. She is the central figure in seven of Manet’s masterpieces of the period 1862-1872, where her attitude and costume (or lack of) came to define “la femme moderne” in mid-19th century France. 
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 28 December
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15 € 
Payment Instructions: 

Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

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Monday 14 December
        The Portraits of Edgar Degas
 

Edgar Degas (1834-1917), one of the key founders of the Impressionist group in 1873-74, was also the Impressionist painter most committed by taste and classical training to the human figure. Today he is considered one of the greatest portrait painters in the history of art.

Degas is also the first portrait painter of the 19th century to drop the conventions of idealizing grace and sentimental femininity for his depiction of women, endowing his female subjects with distinctive and strong personalities that restore to the gender the individuality and psychological weight usually reserved for the depiction of their husbands.
 
Degas is also unusual for never having painted a portrait on commission. Most of his portraits are of family, friends, artistic colleagues, critics and art collectors, hence people that he was linked to intimately or professionally. This gave him the possibility to interpret his sitters with an absolute freedom and entirely according to his own vision, without regard to convention or the need to flatter. The result is one of the most distinctive and powerful galleries of human portraits in the history of art.
 
 Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 14 December
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15 €
Payment Instructions: 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.
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Monday 7 December
                 The Portraits of Amedeo Modigliani, 1907-1920
Amedeo Modigliani‘s (1884-1920) career in Paris was very brief – a mere 13 years – but his paintings have remained among the best known and most popular works of art of the early 20th century.
Modigliani was one the few early Modernists who concentrated on the figurative portrait as his main subject, at a time when most of his friends and colleagues were leaning toward abstract or near-abstract styles like Cubism. He painted virtually all the avant-garde artists, writers, poets, critics and art dealers of Paris in the heroic years of Modernism (1907-1920), thereby creating a gallery of portraits unparalleled in the history of modern art.
Though abandoning traditional realism, he remained sensitive to the individual features, personality, social class and psychological aura of his subjects, often infusing his depictions with a quality of wit and humor that show up the foibles and pretensions of the “monstres sacrés – like Pablo Picasso and Jean Cocteau - of an extraordinary era.   
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 7 December
Time: 5-6:30 pm French time
Fee: 15 €
Payment Instructions: 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.
 
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Tuesday 24 November
Conclusion: The Battle for Modern Art in Second Empire Paris, 1848-1870

 

Please see a description of this lecture below: Thursday 12 November

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Tuesday 24 November

Time: 6-7:30 pm French time

Fee: This lecture is free 
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Monday 23 November

The Story of Gwen John (1876-1939) 

Gwen John is by many measures one the great painters of the early 20th century, but little known outside of Great Britain. In her lifetime her own career suffered by comparison to that of her flamboyant, Bohemian and very successful brother, the painter Augustus John.

Though she studied at the Slade School in London (the only art school that admitted women in the 1890s) most of her artistic career was, in fact, spent in France where she arrived in 1903. Having to model for artists to make ends meet in Paris, she met and fell passionately in love with the most famous French artist of the day, the sculptor Auguste Rodin.

During her years in Paris she met many of the leading artistic personalities of her time, including Matisse, Picasso, Brancusi and Rainer Maria Rilke. But the new developments in the art of her time had little effect on her, and she worked in solitude. Her beautifully drawn and delicately painted portraits of herself and young models with cats have an intimate feeling and poignant subtlety unmatched by any artist of her time.

In our lecture we will follow the evolution of her art and life from the beginning of her art career in London in the 1890s through her years in Paris and Meudon, to her tragic death, ill and alone, in a hospital in Dieppe just after the outbreak of war in September 1939. 
 
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 23 November
Time: 5-6:30 pm French time
Fee: 15 €
Payment Instructions: 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction. 
-------------------------------------- 
Thursday 12 November
The Battle for Modern Art in Second Empire Paris, 1848-1870
The period between the revolution of 1848, followed by the advent of Napoleon III’s Second Empire in 1851 and its dramatic fall in 1870 is one of the most exciting for the history of French art.

In our lecture we will present the principal institutions of French art of the era, the Academy, the Paris École des Beaux-Arts and the annual Paris Salon. We will see how the artistic traditions and styles these institutions championed were increasingly challenged by the new artists of the period beginning with Gustave Courbet, Edouard Manet and Henri Fantin-Latour and finishing with the rise of the future Impressionist group – Degas, Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Sisley, Bazille and Cézanne - in the later 1860s.

We will see how the Salons and the art exhibitions the two Paris World’s fairs of the era - 1855 and 1867 - served as important showcases for the major artists of the Second Empire and their challengers. The pictures of many of the Salon artists we will be analyzing are also on view at the Musée d’Orsay and the Louvre and they include major works by Ingres, Couture, Chassériau, Cabanel and Meissonier.

 

Place: Zoom lecture

Date: Thursday 12 November

Time: 6-7:30 pm French time

Fee: 15 €

Payment Instructions: 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link: 
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris

Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will receive the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.  

 
Monday 9 November
In Praise of Painting - Dutch Masterpieces at the Met 
 
Dutch paintings of the 17th century —the Golden Age of Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer—have been a highlight of The Met collection since the Museum's founding purchase in 1871. This exhibition brings together some of the Museum's greatest paintings to present this remarkable chapter of art history in a new light. Through 67 works of art organized thematically, In Praise of Painting orients visitors to key issues in 17th century Dutch culture—from debates about religion and conspicuous consumption to painters' fascination with the domestic lives of women.
In our lecture we will focus on the division of Dutch painting into distinctive genres: Still Life, Landscape, Marines, Cityscape, Portraiture, Domestic scenes, History and Religious painting. We will see how taken together they offer a complete vision of Dutch society and its values in a manner that was absolutely unique in European art of the 17th century.
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 9 November
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15 €
Payment Instructions 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link: 
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will receive the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction. 
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Monday 2 November

Aubrey Beardsley 

 

Aubrey Beardsley (1872-1898) shocked and delighted late-Victorian London with his sinuous black and white drawings in which he explored the erotic and the elegant, the humorous and grotesque.

The exhibition covers Beardsley’s intense and prolific career as a draughtsman and illustrator, cut short by his untimely death from tuberculosis at the age of 25. Beardsley’s charismatic persona played a part in the phenomenon that he and his art generated, so much so that the 1890s were dubbed the ‘Beardsley Period’ in England. All of the notorious illustrations for Oscar Wilde’s “Salomé” and Aristophanes’ “Lysistrata” are on view as well as the romantic Pre-Raphaelite-style illustrations for Malory’s “La Mort Darthur”.
Originating at Tate-Britain this is the largest display of Beardsley’s original drawings in Europe since the seminal 1966 exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum, which triggered a Beardsley revival in the late ‘60s.
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 2 November
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15 €
Payment Instructions 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link: 
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will receive the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction. 
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Thursday 29 October
Man and his Women: The Stories of Kiki, Berenice and Lee
Man Ray (born Emmanuel Radnitzky) arrived in Paris from New York in 1921. His best French friend in New York was the founder of the New York Dada movement, the notorious Marcel Duchamp with whom he had been collaborating since they had met in 1917. In Paris, however, he quickly switched from experimental but unsaleable avant-garde art objects to the more profitable field of photography. Man Ray quickly became one of the most popular portrait photographers of the “années folles” – the jazz age – in Paris and photographed nearly all of the French and Anglo-American celebrities of the art and literary worlds of the 1920s and 1930s.  In our lecture we will concentrate on his relationships with the three most important women of his Paris career: his lover and “it girl” of Bohemian Paris, Kiki de Montparnasse, his first studio assistant and future rival, the New York photographer Berenice Abbott, and the classic American beauty of the 1930s - model, lover and photographer - Lee Miller.
Through his portrayals of the three women we will see how Man Ray forged three different but essential visions of the “new” woman of the 1920s and 1930s. His photos emphasize the sense of radical transformation, new-found freedom and liberated sexuality that Paris represented for many women escaping their homes and families in the post-WWI era. From nearly one hundred years ago Kiki, Berenice and Lee remain iconic representations of the type of free woman that so many conservatives are still fighting against today. 
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Thursday 29 October
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15 €
Payment Instructions 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link: 
https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will receive the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction. 
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Monday 26 October
Giorgio de Chirico and La Pintura Metafísica
 

The Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico (1888-1978) was born in Greece where his father worked as railway engineer. Greek light and classical culture but also the German Symbolism fashionable at the turn of the 20th century affected his early artistic experiments alongside his younger brother, Alberto Savinio. As a student at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich in 1906, he discovered the writings of Nietzsche and Schopenhauer as well as the works of Arnold Böcklin and Max Klinger. After Milan and Florence, it was in Paris, in the autumn of 1911, that he established his unique visual vocabulary after discovering French Cubism. De Chirico was quickly taken up by numerous art critics and writers of the time: Guillaume Apollinaire, Maurice Raynal, André Salmon, André Breton, Paul Éluard and Jean Paulhan were among the first to discover and  promote his art. Paul Guillaume, whose collection is displayed at the Orangerie museum in Paris was his first art dealer.

On his return to Italy in 1915, de Chirico and his brother Savinio were incorporated into the Italian army at Ferrara where both continued their artistic experiments. It is in this Renaissance city of endless arcades and rectilinear architectural perspectives that de Chirico and Savinio met and had a great impact on the young painters Carlo Carrà and Giorgio Morandi.  An entirely new Italian modern style was born of the encounter which came to be known as “La Pintura Metafísica”, or “Metaphysical Painting”. The strange figures and fragments that populate the dream-like spaces of de Chirico's works are fundamental also for the future development of Surrealist painting, notably the art of Max Ernst, René Magritte and Salvador Dali.  

 

Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 26 October
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15 €
Payment Instructions 
Please let me know which your prefer and please state the name or date of the lecture you wish to attend:
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you on the SUMUP system.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link:
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC : CMCIFRPP          IBAN : FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.

You will be receive the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction. 

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Thursday 22 October

The Golden Age of Danish Painting Conclusion


Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Thursday 22 October

Time: 5-5:40 pm French time

Fee: Free 
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Monday 19 October 2020
 
The Golden Age of Danish Painting (1801-1864)
 
The Danish Golden Age is traditionally thought of as a period of unparalleled artistic and cultural flourishing in Denmark from 1801 to 1848. Artists worked to forge an image of a proud and united nation by focusing on the Copenhagen bourgeoisie and the bucolic landscapes of their homeland.
The leading figure of the Danish Golden Age, Christoffer Eckersberg, was at the root of the remarkable artistic revival in Denmark. As professor at the Royal Academy, he trained an entire new generation of painters: Wilhelm Bendz, Christen Købke, Martinus Rørbye, Constantin Hansen, Wilhem Marstand among others.
 
The cultural scene was vibrant, more and more exhibition venues were opening, and a rising bourgeois class guaranteed artists a regular clientele of collectors. Commissions from the new bourgeoisie contributed to the growing trend for portraits, as did a taste for portraying intimate family circles. The artists themselves painted self-portraits that reflected their new social status. A great importance was given to children’s portraiture showcasing the importance of education and good upbringing in Danish culture. 
The exhibition also evokes the artists’ fascination with the world, from its breath-taking vastness down to its minutest detail. They created a new vision of the infinitely large, with pictures of wide-open skies, and the infinitely small, with extremely accurate botanical studies. The development of open-air painting allowed them to paint landscapes with new and unusual perspectives. 
The freshness and openness of the Danish painters’ visionof the world in this period, their attachment to middle class values of family harmony and propriety, the slow rhythms of city and country life, visible in their art, offer a unique and often nostalgic vision of a golden age - a bygone era as yet untouched by the turbulence, the social, economic and political tensions of the industrial modern world. 
 
Place: Zoom lecture
Date: Monday 19 October
Time: 5-6:40 pm French time
Fee: 15€
Payment Instructions (please let me know which your prefer):
1. Payment after reception of an invoice on 30 September for several lectures by any of the methods below.
2. By credit card via SUMUP if you send me your cell number for the transaction link.
As soon as payment goes through please send me the last 4 digits of your credit card which enable me to identify you.
3. By PayPal indicating the date of the lecture to this link: https://www.paypal.me/AMKEFriendsofPaxos
4. By transfer if you have a European account to:
Chris Boicos Fine Arts
BIC: CMCIFRPP
 IBAN FR76 3006 6100 1100 0103 7760 182     
Bank : CIC Paris République, 201 rue de Temple 75003 Paris
Please quote your name in the transfer information.
You will be receiving the Zoom meeting details as soon as you send me an email notice of the transaction.

 

 
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